leges w●ere great.Knights were free▓d from all “gelds” and taxes and from all ●other services and burthens by Henry I.,▓ in order “that being so alleviated, they may▓ instruct themselves in the use of horses and ar●ms, and be apt and ready for m▓y servic
e and the defence of my kin●gdom.” Salisbury also me
y immunities and ▓more eminent privileges, and has
he▓r sordid burthens.” Yet another a●dvantage, of doubtful value perhaps, ▓was that of being rated at a high value w▓hen taken prisoner in war.His ransom, always hi●gher than a less titled personage▓, sometimes amounted to ten thousand cro▓wns, but if of higher value than th●at, the captor was obliged to surre
nder● him to the king.Those who were knighted ▓for v
alour on the field of battle were empo▓wered to use the square instead of the swal▓low-tailed pe
nnon, as knights ban●neret, and had the p
rivilege of a war-cry.From● this came t
he mottoes of the modern “coats of ●arms.” The history of knighthoo●d is a part, and a very i
ns and forms of the arms and armour▓ of the Middle Ages.The honours it off●ered were so great and highly prized, that ▓it increased martial enthuhe part taken ●by women in rewarding the exer
tions of the kn▓ights both in the tournament and in ba▓ttle, exercised an enormous i●nfluence over the warlike portio●n of mankind.Where the prize●s were so grea t, attention to arms of ●offence and armour of defence became natural ●and right.The chivalric feelin●g engendered by knighthood and knightly ex▓ercises was not confined to jou▓st and tournament in times of peace.It was a us▓eful and valuable adjunct to personal braver●y in war.“Oh that my lady co
uld see me now!〃埍 said a knight as h
e successfully led▓ his men to the storm of a w
●ell defended breach.The spirit thus aroused ●was due to the knightly customs ●of the times. But this
“chiva▓lrous” and in a wide sense “coward●l
y” system was to receive two rude shocks.The ●first came from the Swiss mountaineers, who wi▓th
the pike grievously routed the gorge●ous knighth
m the results o●f the brain-thought of th
e peac●eful chemist who rediscovered gu▓npowder.

until o

bull?/h2>

; and finally regular double▓ mail extending over the head and enti●re body.Over the mail coif was wor▓n a conical helmet with

第二章爸你看那里小玲

a “nasal” or no●se-piece, followed by a cylindri●cal flat-topped helmet

第二章爸你看那里小玲

over t●he coif; and finally the latter was replaced by● a round topped hel

第二章爸你看那里小玲

met from which depended a ▓mail cape or camail.Similarly as iron repl▓aced

第二章爸你看那里小玲

mail for the headpiece, so were kne●e-pieces, elbow-guards and neck-guard?/p>

第二章爸你看那里小玲

坰 of plate added.The foot-soldier wore an iron ●headpiece, and now and then a ▓back and breast plate, but he was generally b▓a

It is a long established

dly provided with defensive ●armour, and relied on the leather “▓buff” c

It is a long established

oat or clothing of quilted cl●oth.But the armour from the end of the fourte

It is a long established

en▓th century to the beginning of the sixteenth ●century became more and m

Contrary to popular belief, Lorem Ipsum is not simply random text. It has roots

Events & News

ore ●massive.At first mixed armou▓r,—mail and plate,—then plate armour chi▓efly.In the former period more and ▓more pieces o

26/06/2015

Sed ut perspiciatis

f iron plate we●re used to cover weak parts, s●uch as knees, elbows and sho▓ulders, cuirasses, leg-pieces

th●e use

26/06/2015

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, thigh-p●ieces, gorgets (for the neck),▓ shoes (sollerettes), and gaun▓tlets for the hands, appear succe

of the23 h

26/06/2015

Sed ut perspiciatis

ssively, un▓til the only mail armour was that hung ●from the waist in front, between▓ the plate cuisses t

alf pike.A
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